New Orleans Hauntings - HauntedHouses.com (Louisiana)

Description:

New Orleans is a city that has a unique historical blend of mysterious voodoo and slavery in its past, which means that many of its haunted places, houses, and ghosts are created as a result of this colorful, if macabre history. Almost all of the old houses in the city have a ghost or two hanging around. The attitude of the people who live there was expressed by an owner of a haunted house: "In New Orleans, the ghosts are a part of the package. We just move in and they usually make room for us."

Well - known Haunted Places

I) St. Louis Cemetery, Saint John's Bayou and Laveau House - are the favorite haunts of the famous voodoo priestess, Marie Laveau, who practiced her craft, as early as 1830, in the Congo square area.

Location:

The French Quarter

History:

Marie led voodoo dances in the square, and sold charms and potions from her house on Saint Ann street. She also held rites at Saint John's Bayou, that included naked dancing around bonfires, orgies, and animal sacrifices. Some say she had power over some police and judges, and was able to save some criminals from the hangman.

Manifestations:

Place: Saint John's Bayou -

* On Saint John's Eve, her spirit can be heard singing there.

Still Haunted?

Yes.

 

Place: At the Laveau House - Location: 1020 St. Ann Street, New Orleans, Louisiana. 70116.

*Some people report that the spirit of Marie and her followers still conduct wild voodoo ceremonies this house.

* Her detailed apparition has been seen walking down St. Ann Street, attired in a long white dress, wearing her tignon, which is a scarf with seven knots in it.

* In a drug store on St. Anne Street, her apparition slapped a man in the face when he failed to acknowledge her presence. She then floated to the ceiling. The owner of the store witnessed the whole thing.

Still Haunted?

Yes.

 

Place: Saint Louis Cemetery

Marie Laveau died in the late 1880s and was buried in one of two places, a marked tomb or an unmarked grave Her daughter is thought to be buried in the marked tomb.

* Her distinctive apparition has been seen in the area of the unmarked grave

* She slapped a man who was passing by her grave

* Some say she turns herself into a black crow or a big black dog. Both such animals have been seen roaming the cemetery.

* Many believe that her death didn't stop her from practicing her black magic, using the powers of darkness. Many people leave notes, requests, and offerings on her grave and tomb.

Still Haunted?

Yes

 

2) The Beauregard - Keyes House -

Location:

Can be found across from the Convent of Ursula in the French Quarter. Address: 1113 Charles Street, New Orleans, LA.

History:

This grand mansion, built in 1812, is a strong candidate for being the most haunted house in New Orleans. A General Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard lived in this house until 1869. General Beauregard was the commanding officer of the southern troops at the bloody battle at Shiloh.

* At 2:00 in the morning, on foggy, moonlit nights, General Beauregard and his troops materialize out of the wood paneled walls along the hallway near the ballroom. The living are treated to the clattering footsteps of his entire phantom troops. All the soldier apparitions and the General appear in full Confederate dress uniform, and then slowly turn bloody and tattered, as if they are revisiting their bloody battle.

* Also, an apparition fiddler player and dancing entities have their own dance party in the ballroom, complete with fiddle music, perhaps reenacting a happier time.

Still Haunted?

Definitely yes!

3) Madam Lalaurie's Mansion - ( Warning - This story isn't for the sensitive, but must be told. The actions of one woman put a stop to a horrid situation. One person can make a difference.)

Location:

1140 Royal Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70116.

Description:

The outside of this three story, 40 room mansion is very plain, except for the delicate lace ironwork placed around the second floor balcony, and the first floor arched windows. The inside of the mansion was excessively and lavishly decorated with only the best of the very best. The outside of this three story mansion is very plain, except for the delicate lace ironwork placed around the second floor balcony, and the first floor arched windows. The inside of the mansion was excessively and lavishly decorated. The portico near the entrance had marble floors and gold gilded mirrors. The mahogany doors of the parlors and dining rooms had hand-carved panels of flowers and cherubs' faces. Crystal chandeliers provided light in the rooms, with hundreds of candles. Big, taller than a man stone fireplaces could be found in every room. Satin and velvet hung from the walls, and guests ate off of the finest china.

History:

Louis and Delphine Lalaurie bought this huge, elegant 40 room mansion from Mr. Soniatdu Fossat, on August 13, 1831. High society of New Orleans were happy to have such a grand place to hold their gala balls and social events. While Delphine Lalaurie was a marvelous hostess, and knew how to entertain, she also was proven to be an evil, cruel, sadistic psychopath when it came to the treatment of her slaves. She had to flee New Orleans, in 1834 when fire fighters discovered how she had tortured, maimed horribly and killed many of her slaves in slow and agonizing ways in her torture chamber located in the garret apartment, the attic and other places throughout the mansion, thoroughly enjoying the sadistic cruelty of her actions.

Thanks to the brave actions of the house cook, who started a fire in the kitchen, while she was chained to the kitchen floor, all this barbarity was stopped when firefighters rescued some of the victims that were still alive in the torture chambers, which in turn brought to light Delphine Lalaurie's secret, sick passion. The cook was the one who pleaded with the firemen to go to the garret apartment to see for themselves how Lalaurie had cut off her victims' body parts, cut open other areas of human bodies and pulled things out, removed smaller parts, sewing eyes and mouths shut, etc. Years later, when workmen were remodeling the interior, they found the skeletons of her torture victims dumped in holes under sections of the mansion's floor, so she wouldn't have to answer for their demise.

The mansion was sold in 1837, but people didn't stay there long because of all the ghostly hauntings. An eccentric, Jules Vignie, wasn't bothered by it at all and lived there in the 1880s - 1890s. Around the turn of the century, the mansion was turned into apartments for Italian immigrants. The owners had a hard time keeping renters. Finally, in the 20th century, the mansion was renovated to its former splendor and is a favorite place for touring visitors.

Manifestations:

Throughout the years, many incidents have been reported.

* Tortured screams and groans have been heard from the attic.

* A servant sleeping in the barn awoke to find a pale, black-haired woman choking him. A black apparition took the woman's hands off his throat, and they both vanished, to the astonishment and relief of the servant.

* A large black man wrapped in chains on the main stairs confronted an Italian tenant, but disappeared on the last step.

* Sounds of an invisible chain being dragged down the staircase.

* Shrouded figures flail at the living with riding crops.

* Terribly maimed, translucent apparitions have haunted the living, showing them the results of their torturous ordeal.

* A young Italian mother found an apparition of a wealthy white woman bending over her sleeping baby, who was later identified as Delphine Lalaurie herself.

* Neighbors have reported throughout the years of the mansion's windows opening and closing by themselves, and the front door opening by itself.

* Some passing by at night have seen the reenactment of the young slave girl jumping off the roof to her death to escape her crazed mistress and her merciless whip. The girl had escaped from her chains and ran onto the roof, with her mistress not far behind. Her dying screams are chilling to all who hear them now, as it must have been to the neighbor who saw the original incident in 1833 and reported it to the police. This was a real event that started to show others what was going on in the house.

* The heart breaking cries of a little slave girl has been heard near the cherub fountain in the courtyard.

Still Haunted?

Yes.

 

4) The Hermann-Grima Historical House -

Location:

820 St. Louis Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70116.

Manifestations:

* Pleasant, cordial ghosts, with southern manners live here and do their best to help the living, who they graciously share this house with. Obviously, they are pleased with the renovation job done on their precious home. Caretakers find that these unseen presences like to scatter fragrant rose and lavender around the rooms to freshen and air.

* On cold winter mornings, the living often find that the ghosts have lit the fireplaces to warm the rooms, and keep them cozy.

Still Haunted?

Yes.

These manifestations are still happening.

 

Photo Sources include: Hgghh.org * NewOrleansOnline.com
Explore-New-Orleans.com* DigitalCity.com * Inetours.com
* Whatwasthen.com


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